Wacko Birds & Other Dodos

I readily admit I wasn’t as taken with Rand Paul’s filibuster as some other people were. For one thing, I thought if he was going to engage in a 13-hour talkfest, it should have been when Chuck Hagel was on the hot seat. After all, John Brennan is a far better choice to head up the CIA than Hagel is to be Secretary of Defense or, for that matter, a men’s room attendant in the Senate office building.

For another thing, it would have been far more important to use Hagel’s confirmation as a way to get to the bottom of the Benghazi massacre and Obama’s subsequent cover-up than it was to get Eric Holder to promise he wouldn’t use drones to kill American-born terrorists in the U.S.

Having now made my own position clear, I want it noted that I think it is time that John McCain and Lindsey Graham quit bad-mouthing the likes of Rand Paul, Ted Cruz and Justin Amash, for not taking their marching orders from Republican dinosaurs such as themselves.

McCain, in particular, has a lot of gall calling them names and stating, “It’s always the wacko birds on the right and left that get the media megaphone.” Well, he ought to know. Ever since the NY Times, during the 2008 Republican primaries, referred to him as a statesman, McCain has rarely been more than a few inches away from a megaphone. What McCain and a few others can’t seem to grasp is that when the Times refers to a Republican as a statesman, it either means the guy just dropped dead or that he is the GOP primary candidate most likely to lose in the general election to a Democrat.

Recently, Mitt Romney told Chris Wallace that he realizes that as the fellow who lost the election to Obama, he can’t very well expect to be a spokesman for the GOP. Well, Romney came a lot closer to defeating Obama than McCain did, but we haven’t yet seen McCain grasp the fact that the parade has passed him by.

Inasmuch as McCain’s major accomplishments were getting his name entwined with those of Russ Feingold and Ted Kennedy on lousy pieces of legislation, and opposing the very enhanced interrogations that led to the execution of Osama bin Laden, one has to wonder why Arizona’s Republicans didn’t long ago retire his sorry butt to Phoenix, where he could raise chickens and bore the old timers at the local diner, telling them what a swell guy Ted Kennedy was.

Although I still like Marco Rubio, I’m a little concerned that he will merely pick up where McCain left off when it comes to comprehensive immigration reform. The Republicans went into such total shock after Obama took 71% of the Hispanic vote against Romney that they run a very good risk of shooting themselves in the foot, in the leg and in the head, in their attempt to make an inroad with that particular ethnic group.

But before they toss all of their principles out with the bath water, they should keep in mind the way that Reagan was sucker-punched by the Democrats. On the mere promise that the liberals would secure the southern border, Mr. “Trust-But-Verify” signed the 1986 amnesty bill. In appreciation, Latinos gave his successor, George H.W. Bush, a measly 30% of their votes in 1988. And in the six presidential races since then, they have given the Republican candidate an average of just 29%.

But, as you may have noticed, blacks don’t exactly flaunt their appreciation of Abe Lincoln’s political party, either.

My suggested response to Senator Rubio and all the other well-intentioned Republicans who start beating the drum, demanding a pathway to citizenship for illegal aliens, is to take a page out of the football fan playbook, and start chanting: “De-fence! De-fence! De-fence!”

Author Bio:

Burt Prelutsky, a very nice person once you get to know him, has been a humor columnist for the L.A. Times and a movie critic for Los Angeles magazine. As a freelancer, he has written for the New York Times, Washington Times, TV Guide, Modern Maturity, Emmy, Holiday, American Film, and Sports Illustrated. For television, he has written for Dragnet, McMillan & Wife, MASH, Mary Tyler Moore, Rhoda, Bob Newhart, Family Ties, Dr. Quinn and Diagnosis Murder. In addition, he has written a batch of terrific TV movies. View Burt’s IMDB profile. Talk about being well-rounded, he plays tennis and poker... and rarely cheats at either. He lives in the San Fernando Valley, where he takes his marching orders from a wife named Yvonne and a dog named Angel.
Author website: http://www.burtprelutsky.com/
  • Burt Prelutsky

    supie: I wasn’t a big fan of G.W. Bush, so I don’t appreciate his being tossed in my face when he has nothing to do with anything. But for the record, Bush didn’t hold a candle to Lincoln in terms of being power mad.

    As you may have noticed, the Constitution has been “updated,” for better or for worse, several times. That’s why we have more than 10 Amendments.

    Burt

  • NorCal1

    Well, I have say it again. Republicans just keep on beating each other up. We don’t often see this on the Democrat side. Until we stop it I don’t believe there will be success on a national level. It’s one thing to go after each other during primaries, it’s another to do over and over what Graham and McCain did to Rand. Just like they and others did against the Republican who made the disparaging remark about wetbacks. When they do this they change the issue from a politician saying something stupid to an issue against the Republican Party doing/saying something stupid and the incident is published as the feeling of the party. We need to learn from how Democrats behave. They for the most part stay silent when one of their own does/says something stupid or that as a party they don’t agree with.

  • Wheels55

    I am worried that Rubio will take lessons from those who can’t let go of GOP power. That’s why I like Rand Paul, he seems to go the way of his own drummer and makes a lot of sense while doing so. None of these guys are perfect and this immigration reform issue will show just that.
    The trick is to restructure a slow and perhaps expensive system to one that gets the good people who want to be here through the system faster. This while not rewarding bad behavior and choices, i.e. amnesty. Every person that I have spoken to about their immigration experience says the same thing: it takes a long time but is worth it and they don’t understand why people skirt the system. They don’t want wholesale amnesty. I listen to them, the ones that have experienced this process, over listening to those who talk out their azz.

  • BrianFruman

    Rand Paul has the only chance of more of the youth vote with a laissez faire attitude on drugs and Rubio despite what liberals say would probably fair slightly better than Busch with Latino Voters. So both people have the effect of drawing in a broader base. The biggest issue in Congress is the old guard on both sides.I find both parties have to many people that have been there way too long.

    • Burt Prelutsky

      Rand Paul would probably garner a fair number of young votes because he’s in favor of decriminalizing drug use. I think he would also lose a lot of older voters because most Republicans are not libertarians, and they also don’t share Rand or Ron’s positions when it comes to foreign affairs.

      Marco Rubio is a much better fit, but a lot depends on the immigration policy he and his chums come up with.

      Burt

      • BrianFruman

        Thanks for the reply. Please understand I know a lot about drug use. Rand Paul made a good arguement about the last 3 presidents using drugs. Many of which could have led to perminant records. I hope strict conservatives understand the facts about drug use and recovery. AA and NA have worked to help people for decades without government assistance. The real issue is putting a scarlett letter on someone for life. Barring them meaningul employment opportunities. I have seen people that made attempts to go legit but it is always the record that comes back to keep them from doing so. There are those too who will never change regardless how many times you put them away. Also note I do support increases in DCF to make sure the children of addicts are monitored and if need removed from the home.

  • ted

    Republicans are afraid of being thought of badly and the NT TImes, ABCBSNBCNNPR always thinks badly of them. Go figure. They all read the paper and shudder with fear. They are all losers. A true fearless Leader is required for a start, but there’s no one around.

  • ted

    It doesn’t matter who the Republican anything is…(S)he’ll lose. Except some local or state candidates that will be impotent in Congress. Some might change some few states. But the Progressive bulldozer is too strong, they own this country and it’ll be getting worse for freedom and white American men. But hey, the weather’s nice here in Seattle.

    • Burt Prelutsky

      ted: If the Progressive bulldozer is so doggone powerful, how is it that Obama only received 51% of the vote? How is it he was the first two-termer who received fewer votes the second time around? It’s okay to be a little despondent, but it’s nuts to roll over and play dead when the Democrats couldn’t even win back the House.

      Burt

  • Burt Prelutsky

    supie: Perhaps you should read a book and not watch a Steven Spielberg movie. Lincoln was a bit of a despot, and not the fairy tale log-splitter you’ve heard so much about.

    Burt

  • A. C.

    You wrote: “than it was to get Eric Holder to promise he wouldn’t use drones to kill American-born terrorists in the U.S.”

    In this case, the technology is not the crime, it is the foot in the door to expand the crime. The crime is the government executing an American on American Soil without a trial. So it happens by using a drone. Currently, and for the foreseeable future, the U.S. government is not buying any drones that are completely autonomous and unmonitored. All drone killings have, so far, occurred when someone in a control room (or control trailer) pushed a button to launch the weapon. That’s really not different than pulling a trigger no matter whether pulled by a sharpshooter a mile away from the target, or an FBI-trained assassin only a foot away from the individual. None of these means make a person somehow “differently dead.” That’s what makes the drone killings, as well as the close-up assassination not just criminal, but an attack on the constitution as well. That was why it was essential that Holder change the administration’s unconstitutional position of “well, our policy is to not do that,” to “it is a violation of their constitutional rights.” Senator Paul, and others now have the leverage to say, “that killing wasn’t merely to defend themselves, it was an execution, it was criminal, it was a violation of the constitution.”

    • Burt Prelutsky

      A.C.: I don’t think what Eric Holder says is going to mean a damn thing in the long run. But, then, when you see what the federal government has done since the 1860s, hardly anyone seems too concerned with what the Constitution says.

      Burt

  • Shane

    Rand Paul is a publicity hound who will most probably run for President in 2016. I became disenchanged with Paul when he came out for a mass amnesty for illegal aliens; I will not vote for a politician who voted for a mass amnesty. John Brennan is a gutless dhimmi who will not acknowledge that our terrorist enemies are devout Muslims engaged in a Jihad against the West. This idiocy is comparable to the head of the CIA during the Cold War not knowing that our enmies were Communists!

  • Guest

    prelutsky suggests people of color forget what the party of Lincoln did for the…
    phooey… go see the movie for heaven sake. suggesting that the party of Lincoln is anything like todays g o p is pure folly… to suggest that the future lies with the likes of rand paul, ted cruz and jason amash scares hell out of me….

  • supie

    this site resists opinions that differ from the required compliance to it’s contributors..
    discussion is seldom advanced…

    • Burt Prelutsky

      Guest: By advanced, if you mean that everyone has to agree with you, I guess your point is well taken. Not everyone even agrees with me. That’s life.

      Burt

  • trailbee

    Thank you for a good post! Is it just me and my aging, or am I really perceiving an “ambiguous” fog when I hear Marco Rubio or Rand Paul talk about amnesty that isn’t amnesty? I am still waiting for something concrete, something defining to mark their entry onto the pre-Presidential path. Yes, everyone is dissatisfied with the GOP, but so far, I have not felt that ‘brick upside the head” statement yet from anyone. Is it fear of making a statement which could later be used to remove that speaker from the race?

    We have seen what happened to Mitt Romney and his 47% comment. But he was right, and never did apologize for it, just said it was a mistake on his part. At least he actually made real statements of what he would and would not do when he became President. No lies.

    I think I am trying to grasp, get my head around something solid, something that actually tells me who these men are, their true beliefs, which will not be “evolving” into something different at a later date to get some particular votes. I feel like I’m grasping air. And it doesn’t feel good. Maybe the right person has not yet arrived.

    • Burt Prelutsky

      trail: Unless Rubio and the other seven members of the the Gang of 8 insist that a wall be built across our entire southern border and put a date on its completion, I don’t want to hear any more talk about some form of amnesty. Obama keeps talking about building our infrastructure. Let him start with that wall.

      Burt

      • trailbee

        That is something “concrete” I can live with. Yes. Thank you. Are you running? :)

        • Burt Prelutsky

          trail: Only on the tennis court. But I am open to a draft if the nation calls.

          Burt

  • http://twitter.com/MissoulaHome Kris

    Burt- I think we have a shot to get the Hispanic vote back- the key is getting the messaging right. They are more conservative than most people think- that needs to be pounded home with them. Blacks could use a dose of conservatism, and I realize this is a generalization, but they are really set on the government plantation, so it will take a VERY strong message to get through to them. But conservatism resonates in most people- whether they admit it or not…

    • Burt Prelutsky

      Kris: If I didn’t know that young Hispanics do not attend church very often, and prefer staying home and breeding illegitimate babies, I might agree with you. But the facts suggest they are not very conservative, and they have become addicted to free stuff.

      Burt

    • twin130

      Sorry Kris – I wish this were true, but it isnt. Hispanics are not conservative, they’re out-of-wedlock birthrate is 53%, they now support gay marriage, and they rely heavily on government assistance. They are not going to vote Republican. Please read this article by Heather McDonald: http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/332916/why-hispanics-dont-vote-republicans-heather-mac-donald#emailpopup

  • Iklwa

    I still find myself baffled at how the “conservative party” could ever have nominated Messer’s Dole, McCain and Romney.

    If just being the longest living presidential wanna-be is qualification for the post, perhaps I should give it a lash. I have a sneaking suspicion that even a lowly Technician such as myself could garner more support than this crew. While I knew we were doomed from the beginning after Dole’s and McCain’s coronation, I had high hopes for Mr. Romney after watching the debates. It looked like when he was to face Obama, he would actually fight instead of giving a sheepish, McCain-like smile and exposing his throat to the liberal blade…but I was wrong…maybe I shouldn’t run for office after all…he rolled as fast and as far as McCain.

    Reagan wasn’t right about everything but he was right about some things. In particular, he gave voice to conservative principals and then explained how the average American could participate. He also never abandoned those principals for political expediency. When I see politicians willing to throw their ideals away for approval of the likes of the New York Times, I can have no faith they will stand in the fire when it really counts.

    You really have to hand it to Obama. He is an avowed liberal and he never gives an inch.

    He also brings guns to knife fights.

    • Shane

      The GOP is NOT the conservative party. A conservative party would be doomed to be a permanent minority party. The GOP needs moderate voted to win the Presidency and the Senate.

      • http://www.facebook.com/paul.vasek.5 Paul Vasek

        Not true, all of the mushy moderates lost!

        • Burt Prelutsky

          Paul: Not true. Understand that politics usually break down along geographical lines. It’s easy for a conservative candidate to win in places such as Texas, Utah and Oklahoma, but impossible on the west coast and in NY, Illinois and New England. As Shane pointed out, a conservative party would never ever win a national election, and they would prevent the GOP from winning one. Reagan won because moderates voted for him because they knew he wasn’t a real conservative. A real conservative would not have raised taxes twice in California and signed the most liberal abortion bill in America. And keep in mind, as president, he signed the amnesty bill without closing the southern border. If he were to run today, you’d call him a mushy moderate.

          Burt

      • Burt Prelutsky

        Shane: You’re right.

        Burt

        • Drew Page

          Both of you ought to join the Democrat party, genuflect, kiss Obama’s ring and blame George Bush for all that ails America. That is the Democrat definition of “moderate”.

          • Burt Prelutsky

            Drew: That is probably the single dumbest comment that has ever been posted here. Call 1-800-DIMWITS and collect your booby prize.

            Burt

      • Iklwa

        Sadly, you are right.

        Even more sadly, the Republican Party is only winning alternative to the Democrat Party.

        Short of throwing in the towel, we are left with few winning alternatives if we intend to influence American politics at all.

        Until such time as a viable conservative party arises, I am afraid I will have to hold my nose (all too common a practice) and continue to cast my support to the Republicans.

  • twin130

    I’m still trying to figure out why it’s heartless to expect that our laws be enforced and our borders secure. So tired of hearing about those people “living in the shadows” and their poor children. Well maybe they should’ve thought about what might happen if they got caught before they broke the law to come here. I wish some of the immigrants who are waiting to come here legally would speak out. They will be pushed to the back of the line, which is completely unfair. So we will reward the lawbreakers with amnesty, and punish those who did the right thing

    • Burt Prelutsky

      twin: You seem to have a firm grasp on reality. I’m guessing you’re a conservative. Welcome to my world.

      Burt

  • http://www.facebook.com/VinnyBickler Vincent R Bickler

    Burt, you nailed McCain and his shallow, weak positions. He should retire and read a lot more history. He misses the boat on so many important issues. The GOP will continue to lose elections with the Rhinos running the show. Only strong, conservative candidates will overcome the Left.

    • Burt Prelutsky

      The problem, Vincent, is that strong conservatives can not win national elections. They can’t even win presidential primaries. Reagan was not a strong conservative, but he was an appealing candidate and a great campaigner. Before you blow a gasket, I’ll remind you that as governor of my state, Reagan raised taxes twice and signed the most liberal abortion bill in America. As president, he signed the amnesty that opened the floodgates to millions of illegal aliens. In spite of all that, he was a terrific president, but we Republicans are fooling ourselves if we think Reagan would pass the conservative litmus test these days.

      Burt

      • http://www.facebook.com/paul.vasek.5 Paul Vasek

        Reagan did make some mistakes such as amnesty, but he was pro-life and articulated it quite well. He was a conservative.

        • Burt Prelutsky

          Paul: He was pro-life, but he signed the most liberal abortion bill in America?

          Burt

          • http://www.facebook.com/paul.vasek.5 Paul Vasek

            Why do you persist in going back to when he was governor. As president, his record speaks for itself.

  • Ed

    Yaaaaaaaaaawn. Next.

    • Burt Prelutsky

      Ed: If you wish to make a point, you should let us all know what is boring you.

      Burt

      • Ed

        Whats boring me at this moment is how i realize that after 50 years all we conservatives do is fight the same fights talk the same talk every day every year…. And the only positve things that come put of it is that Rush and Sean and Glenn and Bernie and every politician… Gets rich off books that we all buy. Im TIRED of that same old crap year after year….yawn

        • Burt Prelutsky

          Ed: Well, perhaps instead of yawning, you come up with a few original ideas and set us all straight.

          Burt

          • Ed

            The “Idea’s” are simple, they are the same answers to all the same questions, that we have spewed for eternity. It is not a “few original ideas” we need, its the PEOPLE that need to change, not the methods. What needs to be done is clear, and it will work, it’s common sense. The “makers” know the answer, the “takers” don’t care. Why would “takers” want to change a damn thing?. The new American Dream of the “takers” is to go on American Idol or Disability!, the The American Dream for for many Conservative people is to write a book and smell the arm sweat of Glenn & Sean. Takers spawn off more “takers” each and every year by FAR, more than we “makers” do. Rich people dont want to spread their beloved wealth to more than a child or two (in Rush’s case NONE!), while “takers” pop out 4, 5, 6… 8! at a clip!. They have the numbers, it is a fight you cannot win at this point. It needs to collapse. But I cannot help but be disgusted that all “we” get out of the conservative movement is to make these few talking heads into millionaires and billionaires while the rest of us are just getting by in comparison! and all the writer wannabes are just DYING to get in line, write a book, get famous, then YOU can buy the $100 per lb steaks that Rush pushes. YOU can get a ranch in Texas like Glenn, YOU can live on the water in Long Island like Sean! Maybe next to Jimmy Buffett!!, well Sir, I am a capitalist but i am DAMN tired, of this being all we get out of our movement! Same crap every year, make our vocal leaders into gazillionairs, make new famous writers and talking heads, make them wealthy….make no progress. The reason we “keep beating each other up” is EXACTLY this reason. As I said- Yaaaaaawn….

  • Brhurdle

    I certainly agree that McCain’s and Graham’s unhappiness with Paul appears to have been driven by their disdain for someone else assuming a leadership role. McCain especially seems to be addicted to delivering his proclamations in front of a TV camera. It has become obvious that neither Cruz nor Paul are willing to subject themselves to the self imposed leadership of McCain and Graham – a fact that the majority of Republicans appreciate. While I find many of Paul’s positions on foreign relations and defense totally unacceptable, I do appreciate his challenging the old guard in the hopes that new leadership more effective than McCain and Graham will emerge.

    • Burt Prelutsky

      Br: The problem is that Rand Paul isn’t campaigning on behalf of new leadership, but on behalf of Rand Paul. I’m afraid the nut doesn’t fall too far from the tree.

      Burt

      • Brhurdle

        My opinion is that Paul is an unacceptable fit for a Republican Presidential Candidate. My hope is that if others see that Paul can successfully buck the McCain/Graham PR machine, then they will emerge out of the shadows to push McCain/Graham aside.

        • Burt Prelutsky

          McCain & Graham aren’t entirely useless, although it often appears that way. They have led the fight to get to the bottom of the Benghazi scandal, although it now appears that Obama and Mrs. Clinton have managed to brazen their way through it. That’s what comes of having a media as toothless and corrupt as anything Stalin ever fantasized about.

          Burt

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100002489593480 John Probst

        Good

    • Iklwa

      The only reason we see (and hear) so much from McCain is the media is primarily liberal. McCain, by and large, supports many liberal positions. Besides, it’s always so much fun to trot out the looser for his opinion. It only serves to reinforce the liberals’ decision to vote Obama and brow beat conservatives with object lessons on how poor the conservative party leadership really is. It serves to tell the main body of Republicans that we will never make progress with the current “leadership”.

      The message is:

      We should all just give up and go home.

      • Burt Prelutsky

        Ik: All people have to do is vote McCain out of office. The system works if only people aren’t too lazy and stupid to work it.

        Burt

        • Iklwa

          Burt,

          I agree!

          Every time the conversation boils down to an informed, uncaring electorate’s lack of responsibility for electing good government representation, I am left wondering how allowing a largely uninformed, disinterested populous with no skin in the game (i.e. not having to pay income tax) to vote is such a good idea.

          The very fact that those such as McCain are perennially re-elected by large margins shows how easily the uninformed public can be and are misled.

          Of course, the democrats will never reassess the voting rights laws as they would be directly impacted. Their power structure is based primarily upon the easily swayed, ignorant and narrow-minded.

          Sorry if that sounded a little harsh…but the truth can sometimes be bitter.

  • http://www.facebook.com/adrian.vance1 Adrian Vance

    If we had put one nuke on Pyongyang in 1951 we would not have had to fight the Korean War, which is still ongoing, never settled, or Vietnam with the loss of hundreds of thousands of young men and trillions of Dollars. We could do it today!

    See The Two Minute Conservative at: http://tinyurl.com/7jgh7wv and when you speak ladies will swoon and liberal gentlemen will weep.

    • Burt Prelutsky

      Adrian: As you may have noticed, aside from Grenada, we haven’t really tried to win a war since 1945. We play for ties, and we generally wind up losing.

      Burt

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100002489593480 John Probst

    Romney didn’t lose Bernie–he won in alandslide of Electoral Votes but the election was stolen by massive vote fraud in all the key states, incl. 100-140% voter turnout in several places–I mean, you don’t even need a recount to throw those results out..Have you written about that, Bernie? And John Brennan is a convert to Islam, no?

    • Burt Prelutsky

      John: I’m not Bernie.

      Burt

      • Drew Page

        Burt, you aren’t Bernie, but the points made by Mr. Probst are still valid. When the number of votes for a candidate exceed the number of registered voters there is something very wrong with the results. Someone once said that the number of votes cast for a candidate don’t matter as much as the person who counts those votes.

        • Burt Prelutsky

          Drew: That’s true up to a point. I simply don’t believe that the Democrats swiped enough votes to have made the difference in a national election. These things are far more likely to spell the difference in a congressional raise, such as the one that cost Rep. West his seat in the House.

          Burt

  • DOOM161

    On a plus note, now that Obama is free to fire his old cabinet and nominate the people he really wanted, the people might finally see how awesome his policies really are.

    • Burt Prelutsky

      DOOM: They had plenty of time to see it during his first four years. Now we can only hope that the GOP hangs on to the House in 2014 and makes inroads in the Senate.

      Burt

  • JohnInMA

    On the Hispanic vote, oddly George W. got ~35% and ~45% of their vote in each election, respectively. I am more or less apolitical, so my memory of details of campaigns and elections can be foggy (kind of like my memory of coming out of an anesthesia stupor…). But I seem to recall many flapping jaws and spastic pens claiming that his support of basic rights (?) for illegal immigrants was a huge factor. Specifically he was against removing children of illegals from public schools, or something close to that, and of course was pushing an idea that many like to label with the scarlet A (amnesty). Was it one of the few examples of his Compassionate Conservatism? You be the judge. Regardless, ‘experts’, ahem, in political matters still attribute his ‘success’ to those things.

    So, at least you can say the GOP might be moving their worldview up into the early 21st Century with respect to strategy. I don’t really care. I get disgusted by open and sycophantic pandering. But I don’t know how you can avoid it when the other party has it practically trademarked and patented. Worse, modern progressives are quickly mastering a new art of DEFINING ever more new groups to which they can pander. I joke with my wife that watching NYC politics from a short distance (well, 120 miles), I’d swear progressives have at least found two new groups to isolate and either support or denigrate – smokers and fat people. Soon there might be Upper Eastsiders who will be defined, isolated, and indulged (pandered to) from Borough Dwellers, once they run out of the more obvious ways to discriminate…….I mean to separate.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100002489593480 John Probst

      Guess what?? All “Hispanics” are not alike-a racist notion of journalists.. older polls i have seen suggest that about 1/2 Hispanic-AMERICANS don’t support Open Borders

      • Burt Prelutsky

        John: And a fairly large percentage of blacks are opposed to same-sex marriages. So what? In presidential elections, 70% of Hispanics and 90-95% of blacks will vote for anyone with a (D) after his or her name.
        “Racist notion of journalists”? Now, the truth, aren’t you ashamed to have written such a stupid comment?

        Burt

        • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100002489593480 John Probst

          not at all, Burt..what’s stupid about accusing journalists of reverse racism??

    • Burt Prelutsky

      John: Frankly, I think the GOP is in a tizzy over nothing. Obama was the first president to have ever been elected to a second term and receive fewer votes than he did in his first election. Plus he only received 51% of the vote. Hardly numbers that should create a panic among Republicans. That is especially the case when you realize that no Democrat is ever as likely to bring out so many black voters again.

      Burt

      • JohnInMA

        Burt, I agree with one caveat: My gut tells me that there is a growing trend that freebies are winning and perhaps will win even more future elections. Promising “stuff” has been a staple for politicians and in elections, but it seems like both sides (those who promise and those who vote) are on steroids. While the next Dem presidential candidate will likely be much less ‘charismatic’ to certain swooning voters, making more “stuff” promises to the ever-growing number of defined groups could be a winner. And we all know that one party has mastered the “stuff” message, and not always the money related “stuff”. “Vote for me and you’ll get special rights and privileges…..”, etc.

        • Burt Prelutsky

          John: The fly in the liberal ointment is that, no matter that Obama says our debt is sustainable, it really isn’t. The golden goose eventually dies. That’s when the freebies end.

          Burt

          • JohnInMA

            The only question that remains is whether the goose MUST die for people to come to their senses, and how long that will take. Until then, get ready for a 2012 groundhog day to play out again, and again, and…

  • cmacrider

    Burt: People like Ted Cruz are so far ahead of McCain that it is pitiful to see McCain attempting to denigrate these conservatives. But when you’ve got a stick in the mud like Priebus running the show, its a wonder these guys can hold on to Oklahoma.

    • Burt Prelutsky

      cma: I am a fan of Ted Cruz. At least so far. Where pols are concerned, you don’t want to climb too far out on a limb.

      Burt