What I Would Ask Martin Luther King

kingWhat would Martin Luther King think? What would Martin Luther King say? What would Martin Luther King do?

Those are the kinds of questions we often hear tossed around by media personalities anytime our country recognizes an important anniversary pertaining to the iconic civil rights leader.

It was 50 years ago this week when Dr. King delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. Even someone like me, who was born after the civil rights movement of the 1960′s, understands how incredibly profound and important the words from that speech were and still are to the moral fabric of our nation.

We look back at our country’s dark racial history, we see how much societal progress has been made over the decades, and we recognize that Martin Luther King spearheaded much of that progress with his unquestioned bravery and his bold leadership.

So when we see that level of bravery and leadership sorely lacking in our country today, it’s natural for us to look to one of the historical greats, and try and channel how they would view and address the deep, sobering challenges that we currently face.

For example, President Obama said  the other day he believes Martin Luther King would support Obamacare.

“I think he understood that health care, health security is not a privilege, it’s something that in a country as wealthy as ours, everybody should have access to,” he told a radio interviewer.

Martin Luther King’s own niece, Dr. Alveda King, disagrees. She told the conservative publication Newsmax that her uncle would have never supported a law that provided contraception and abortion services to American women.

“I don’t believe my uncle would be wanting his little girls when they were little — or his granddaughter— now to be given free birth control,” she said.

Which one of them is right? No one knows for sure.

Elias Groll from ForeignPolicy.com wrote a column the other day titled, “Would Martin Luther King Have Supported a Syrian Intervention?”

Novelist Ariel Dorfman, in a recent column posted on numerous news sites, pondered what Martin Luther King would think of our U.S. surveillance programs in a post 9/11 world.

“What words would he have used to denounce the way the government surveillance he was under is now commonplace and pervasive, potentially targeting anyone in the United States who happens to own a phone or use email?” Dorfman asked.

Robert M. Franklin even wrote a piece on CNN.com, wondering how Martin Luther King would have used social media outlets like Twitter and Facebook to spread his messages.

Though none of us know the answers to such questions, I’m not sure that it would matter all that much if we did. For as much respect and admiration as I have for Martin Luther King and his contributions to this country, he’s not the historical figure I would choose to turn to for guidance on topics like the the national debt, foreign policy, domestic surveillance, and Internet technology.

No, the questions that I would ask him, if I could, would be about racial equality in the year 2013. They would be about whether or not he sees an America whose leaders and citizens are driven toward that dream of a colorblind society that he gave his life for.

I would ask him what he thought about careless accusations of racism routinely being thrown around in this country for the purpose of silencing dissenting viewpoints.

I would ask him what he thought about a media culture that would protect a U.S. president against criticism of his character by proclaiming that such criticism is really motivated by the color of his skin.

I would ask him what he thought of those who insist that non-whites are somehow less capable, or less competent, than white people of simply presenting an identification card at a voting booth.

I would ask him what he thought about those who chose not to invite the only sitting African American in the U.S. Senate to the 50th Anniversary of his “I Have a Dream” speech, merely because that senator happens to be a Republican. Was Senator Tim Scott somehow less relevant to the historic ceremony than actor Jamie Foxx?

I would ask him if racism should be presumed in people’s hearts, with the preponderance of proof laid on them to explain why they’re not racists.

I would ask him what he thought of a national media that holds our black president to much different standards of success, failure, and scrutiny than they did his white predecessors.

I would ask him what he thought of the term “White Hispanic” being concocted and applied to an individual, for no other reason than to advance a media racial narrative that wouldn’t have otherwise been relevant.

I would ask him what he thought about Al Sharpton, and if it ever brings a tear to his eye that Sharpton has become the modern day face of the civil rights movement.

I would ask him what he thought about speakers at his wife’s funeral using the occasion to insult a U.S. president who was in attendance to pay his respects.

I would ask him if he believed that mundane uses of terms like “Chicago”, “food stamps”, “monkeying”, “golf”, “shuck and jive”, and “lazy” are really racial code words or dog whistles.

I would ask him if a rodeo clown donning a mask of President Obama is an act of racism, and if the same answer is true of Americans who peacefully protest because they simply believe they’re taxed enough already.

I would ask him what he thought about his wife speaking out against illegal immigration in 1991, and how he would feel knowing that taking such a stance today is enough to warrant being labeled a racist.

I would ask him what he thinks about those among the liberal ideology who portray distinguished, black conservatives like Clarence Thomas, Condoleeza Rice, and Thomas Sowell as racial sell-outs and Uncle Toms.From a Dead Sleep - by John A. Daly

I would ask him what he thought about those who use the term “white person” as an insult, and as a way of marginalizing an individual’s opinion.

But if I could only ask Martin Luther King one question, I think it would be this:

“You led this country through an era of real, honest to God, ugly, violent racism – racism that many in my generation can’t possibly comprehend. You faced it and greatly diminished it not with racial demagoguery, but with a beautiful message of equality, unity, and love. Does it bother you that despite all of the amazing racial progress that has been made in this country over the decades, in large part because of you, there are so many proclaimed admirers and followers of yours in this country that have absolutely no understanding of what your dream was actually about?”

——–

Update: Roll Call is now reporting that despite earlier reports, including a statement released directly from Senator Tim Scott’s office, Scott was indeed invited to the MLK 50th anniversary event, and someone in his office declined the invitation.

Author Bio:

John Daly couldn't have cared less about world events and politics until the horrific 9/11 terrorist attacks changed his perspective. Since then, he's been deeply engaged in the news of the day with a particular interest in how that news is presented. Realizing the importance of the media in a free, democratic society, John has long felt compelled to identify media injustices when he sees them. With a B.S. in Business Administration, and a 16 year background in software and web development, John has found that his real passion is for writing. His first novel, entitled "From a Dead Sleep", is now on sale! He lives in Northern Colorado with his wife and two children. Like John on Facebook. Follow John on Twitter.
Author website: http://www.johndalybooks.com/
  • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

    >>Could you name one KKK member that is a liberal Democrat?.

    I never accused any liberal Democrats of being in the KKK. Now address what I said. You said that all KKK members are Republicans. Give me some proof to back up that statement or concede that you outright made it up.
    .
    >>I read somewhere, that was the case.
    That’s your argument? You wrote something that was absolutely false, but because you read it somewhere, it’s okay? Just a few minutes ago, you copied and pasted Texas fee information for a different type of identification card, and claimed it was for a VOTER ID card (which you knew it wasn’t). That’s called a lie. How do you explain yourself on that?

    >>How many of those people actually got to vote?.
    I don’t understand your question. You told me that voter fraud was a myth. I gave you statistics that prove otherwise. How do you explain yourself?

    • Wil

      > I gave you statistics that prove otherwise. How do you explain yourself?<

      No, you didn't! The question was: How many of those people actually got to vote

      • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

        First of all, I’ll take your response as an acknowledgement that you’re not going to challenge the other lies I called you out on.

        Now, onto your voter fraud assertion… You said that voter fraud was a myth (aka, it doesn’t actually exist). You were given proof, in the very first statistic on the paged I linked to, that voter fraud absolutely does exist. Many states have convicted people (not just accused them) of committing voter fraud.

        People don’t get convinced of mythical crimes, Wil.

        If you’re asking me how many of those people’s votes were actually counted (I assume as a way of deflecting attention away from the fact that you’ve already been discredited), I would assume none SINCE THEY WERE CAUGHT.

        When someone’s busted for voter fraud, I’m assuming their vote is voided.

        Voter ID laws target those people who are committing voter fraud, but HAVEN’T been caught. That’s the entire point! We want to prevent those people from casting illegal ballots.

        Voter fraud absolutely exists, and the other stats on the page I gave you point out how prone elections are to mass fraud. I see mass fraud in elections as a problem worth dealing with, as do most Americans.

        • Wil

          >Voter fraud absolutely exists<
          .
          Only in the minds of you people that want to suppress the voting rights of the people that won't vote for your kind!

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            Wil, you said earlier that you support voter IDs being required to vote. Does that mean you want to suppress people’s voting rights?

          • Wil

            I support voter IDs as one of the requirements, but also, the other forms of identifications, should be allowed. It my wallet there are 6 other forms of identification.

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            If it’s a picture ID that can actually be validated (driver’s license, pedestrian license, election license, passport etc), that’s fine with me… and that’s the current law in Texas as well (not sure about a passport). If it’s merely a credit card or something like that, there’s no way to tie the identity of the cardholder to person casting the vote. Thus, it’s pointless and prone to fraud.

          • Wil

            As if voter fraud was a problem in America… it ain’t!

  • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

    You know, I wondered why you didn’t bother to post a link to this information, instead of copying and pasting it like you did.

    A simple Google search reveals that this information, which you got off of the Texas Department of Public Safety’s website, is for a DIFFERENT type of ID card, not a VOTER ID card. You mislabeled this information on purpose, which means you lied… AGAIN. That would be the 4th time in your responses to this column alone.

    Wil… You epitomize today’s liberal movement. You can’t win an argument based on the facts so you make up your propaganda and shove it down people’s throats, hoping they’re too lazy to actually research what’s real and what’s not.

    On that very same website is the ACTUAL information:
    http://www.txdps.state.tx.us/DriverLicense/electionID.htm
    IT’S FREE!

    Stop lying about it. If denying reality is the only way you can justify a political stance, what does that say about your political stance?

    • Wil

      Man, It doesn’t take much to rile you people up. When, I provide a link, my post are not visible. I thought a ID card was just that, a ID card. I’m sorry, I’ve upset you so. I hope it doesn’t ruin your day.

  • Wil

    I just bought and installed a new HP computer. I hate Windows 8, very much.

  • Wheels55

    MLK would not agree with much that the left throws out there now, but he would have loved Wild Bill Clinton’s affairs. I bet MLK had more women while married.

  • Brian Fr Langley

    Being Dr. King was a Baptist Pastor, I have no doubt he’d be aggrieved at how things are turning out. Once again liberal dogma conforms history to their own warped perspective. What is it they think Baptist Pastors do??? In asking a society to judge a person by the “content of their character”, rather than their skin color, he was specifically appealing to a unique human attribute. We are NOT instinctive beasts. We have both the capacity to be selfless, or selfish. Noble or ignoble. What would Dr. King say about modern American society? Does anybody think, teenagers engaging in promiscuous sexual behaviors are acting selflessly? Where’s the nobility here? So, if a thing is ignoble, is not it’s encouragement? Is a Government spending money it doesn’t have (outside a printing press) really an act of noblity? How about terminating a pregnancy? Where do we find nobility here? In a desperate attempt to elevate ignominy, liberals resort to calling it “pro-choice”. Yet continue to affirm no choice, in confiscating tax payer dollars, to fund their own social objectives. While selfless giving is charitable and noble, does screeching for Government confiscation to do so, actually rise to a similar level? Dr. King, like most Baptist Pastor’s encouraged us to choose the noble and reject the ignoble. It remains most ironic that even today, we still think our great leaders, are the ones leading us forward, towards nobility.

  • Benmaxcon

    I like Bill Clinton’s idea. Let’s have the same requirements for buying an assault weapon, for voting. You have to be 21, show TWO forms of ID, fill out a lengthy questionnaire about your criminal, domestic, and mental history, and then pass a criminal background check. And in some states, there’s a waiting period of several days. Lets do it, Bill!

  • Wil

    I have the feeling that you would have been aligned with the cabal that funded James Earl Ray’s dastardly deed!

    • StanW

      And what ‘cabal’ would that be, Wil?

      • Wil

        You people!

        • StanW

          Seriously, that’s all you’ve got?

          • Wil

            ’nuff said!

            BTW, Are you wearing your hood and white robe, as we speak. Just wondering.

          • JohnDalyAuthor

            Are you in a hurry today or something? This is weak even for you.

          • StanW

            hahahahaha

            Sorry, I don’t belong the the KKK, I am NOT a Liberal Democrat!

          • Wil

            Name one liberal democrat that is a member of the KKK today. You cannot, they are all republicans!

          • JohnDalyAuthor

            Like who? Which Republicans are members of the KKK.

          • Wil

            Every member of the KKK are conservative Republicans!

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            LIKE WHO? Give me names.

          • Hector Mariscal

            Although he is not alive today, that fine Senator from West VA that passed away, Robert C. Byrd! I will also submit for the record that although he was not a member of the KKK directly, Sen. Albert Gore Sr. voted against the Civil Rights Act, Bird voted against both Black nominees to the supreme court (Marshall and then Thomas). Funny how I didn’t see that portrayed in the “Butler”. Leftist logic, I suppose.

          • Wil

            Name one liberal democrat that is a member of the KKK today.>

            ‘Today’

            I haven’t seen the ‘Butler’ is it any good?

    • JohnDalyAuthor

      That would be because you’re an idiot, Wil.

      • Wil

        Nope, I’ve been reading you messages and I know you very well. You are not fooling anyone, but the toadies in this forum.

        • JohnDalyAuthor

          Which messages, Wil. Give me an example.

          • Wil

            Your entire dissertation about everything. BTW, Senator Tim Scott was invited to the 50th Anniversary of his “I Have a Dream” speech, He declined.

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            My entire dissertation? Please. Don’t wuss out. Give me a specific example. It shouldn’t be that hard, according to you.

            And you’re right about Scott. Turns out that yesterday’s reports were wrong, as was a statement released from Scott’s office. Roll Call reported today that someone in Scott’s office declined the invitation. I admit it when I’m wrong. It’s just frustrating how widely reported it was (both conservative and liberal news sources) that he wasn’t invited.

          • Wil

            John, I’m just too tired. It’s been a busy week.

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            In other words, you don’t have an answer. I rest my case.

    • Integrity

      You must have been pinched from the same loaf as some of the other nincompoops that have posted their drivel to this site. QED

  • cmacrider

    John: As a Canadian I would like to point out that Dr. King’s speech would have been neither historical or significant except for one irrefutable fact. It was delivered to a nation (i.e. the USA) of great conscience. That nation then proceeded to pursue King’s ideal and produced an astounding transformation for African Americans within a relatively short period of time. All the race baiting that is being promoted today is given way more credence than it deserves. Americans should look at their modern history on the race issue on an example of where “Americans may make a mistake in the short term … but if they do … they do their damnest to eventually get it right in the long term.”

    • John Daly

      Good points!

  • West Virginia Matt

    Man, John, that was heavy. I presume that like me, you grow weary of all the sugar-coating of the truth which passes as news these days. Any honest person should be willing to hear and accept all the facts, not just those that support a pre-determined conclusion based on idealogy. Unfortunately most people willingly drink the Kool-Aid of rhetoric and half-truths, thus becoming intellectual zombies with voting rights, because politicians and media outlets have learned that smoke and mirrors are cheaper and more effective than the truth.

    We’ve become a country that is far too fearful to “tell it like it is.”

    • John Daly

      In general terms, I certainly agree with you.

      When it comes to racism in this country, it frustrates me that while we’ve seen unbelievable progress since the days of MLK, there are so many people who work hard to keep our nation’s racial wounds open in order to preserve their own relevance among racial demographics.

      People like me want to live in a country where people are not defined by, and treated differently because of their race. That was the essence of Dr. King’s dream, and it bothers me that people still don’t get that.

  • therealguyfaux

    Martin Luther King Jr, if alive today, would be 84 years old, and presumably mostly retired. If he still had his wits about him, one could ask him (and I mean this 100% seriously): “Dr King, how much of what you said on the Lincoln Memorial steps that day was in complete earnest, and how much of it was what you thought people of good will in the US wanted to hear?”

    Everyone in the political spectrum claims their own little peace of King, based on what they interpret his words to mean. It would be nice to hear from the man himself how much of what he said was meant strictly as hortatory rhetoric and how much was supposed to be actionable advice, i.e., what was wouldn’t-it-be-nice and what was accept-nothing-less.

    • John Daly

      While I don’t think anyone can truly know what goes on in someone else’s head, King’s message was 100% sound. It’s a message that couldn’t be countered with a logical or moral argument because he was on the right side of both.

      I believe he was earnest, and I imagine he would have a pretty hard time stomaching a lot of the divisive, racial rhetoric being tossed around today in his name.

      • ph16

        I know and I think he and the leaders of the movement at the time would be thinking, “Is this what we fought for?”

        • John Daly

          Well, I think he’d be quite pleased with how far we’ve come, especially with the election of the first black president.

          But I also think he’d be appalled by how the media and liberal leaders have worked so hard to keep this country’s racial wounds open, for a multitude of self-serving purposes.

          • Wil

            Have you paid any attention, what is going on in Texas and North Carolina? Yes. I’m talking about black voter suppression!

          • JohnDalyAuthor

            Wil, Is it honestly your belief that black people aren’t smart enough to figure out how to show an ID card at a voting booth? THAT mindset is what is racist… not that of people who support voter ID laws.

          • Wil

            Yeah, right. Only an official state ID. Nothing else is good enough. Voter fraud is a myth. Voter suppression is real!

          • JohnDalyAuthor

            And why do you think black people aren’t capable of getting a state ID, while white people are? Is that really what you’re saying?

            I have faith that anyone over the age of 18 is capable of presenting an ID in order to vote – especially in a country in which we’re required to present an ID for far less important things on a regular, sometimes daily basis.

          • Wil

            Not
            only does the required ID cost money, but Texas shut down places to get them,
            just like they did women’s clinics, meaning people cannot easily get to those
            places, and if they don;t bring exactly the right paperwork with them, they have
            to return. A low income worker has enough trouble taking an hour off to vote,
            let alone a day or two to take care of this. It is disenfranchisement, plain and
            simple. I like IDs too, but only if they are FREE and easy for all to obtain.
            Otherwise, the GOP is just trying to block voters who they think will not vote
            for them. And that is unAmerican and despicable.

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            Wil, They ARE free: http://www.texastribune.org/2013/06/25/dps-begin-offering-free-voter-id-cards-week/

            And any voter who doesn’t want to stand in line on election day can participate in early voting, or mail in their ballot.

            Check and mate.

          • Wil

            Though they are available for no charge, opponents say obtaining the free IDs will still be difficult for potential voters who live far from DPS offices, or who don’t have money to purchase copies of their birth certificates if they don’t already have the document.

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            You’ve been forced to narrow your argument to the point of ridiculousness.

            You just said that you’re fine with requiring IDs for voting as long as they are free. And once you found out that they ARE free, and your entire, impassioned objection came crumbling down, you decided to change your complaint to that of people having to actually get out of bed and leave their home to pick up the ID.

            And I STILL can’t figure out how this is supposed to only be a hurdle for minorities. Can you explain that to me, especially when every poll shows that a large majority of both whites and minorities favor voter ID laws?

            Voting is a right. It’s not an in-house care-giving service where someone should be able to participate in it without expending any effort whatsoever.

            I’ve had to go through the process of registering to vote. I’ve had to renew driver’s licenses. I’ve had trouble finding time to make it to the voting booth on election days (I’ve even missed one or two voting opportunities because I was getting slammed at work). I’ve had to wait in long lines in order to vote. I went through the hassle of filing for mail-in ballots. Never during any of that time did I think, because of the inconvenience, that someone was trying to suppress my vote.

            The liberal argument to voter ID laws is asinine. It’s condescending to minorities and there’s no legitimate argument against it. And as we’ve proven here, it’s largely based on false information.

          • Wil

            I’ve had to go through the process of registering to vote.>>

            And that Sir, should be enough! BTW, How long did you really have to spend in line? Akso, do you really think Texas and North Carolina is trying to make it easier for people to vote?

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            >>And that Sir, should be enough!

            Should it really? Because simply registering to vote doesn’t prevent someone from going to a voting booth, pretending to be me, and casting a ballot in my name. Does it?

            >>How long did you really have to spend in line?

            The longest? Probably around 30 or 40 minutes, but I always tried to go during slower times. I have neighbors who’ve had to wait well over an hour before. What point are you trying to make.

            As far as I’m concerned, mail-in ballots is the way to go. And that option is open to the same people you claim can’t figure out how to bring an ID to a voting booth.

            >>Akso, do you really think Texas and North Carolina is trying to make it easier for people to vote?

            Easier to vote? No. They’re making it harder to commit voter fraud.

          • Wil

            Because simply registering to vote doesn’t prevent someone from going to a voting booth, pretending to be me, and casting a ballot in my name. Does it?>>
            As if, that is happening. The problem is getting people to vote, not making it harder to vote. But, you really know the reason for voting obstacles, don’t you!

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            It IS happening. Every election cycle, there are reports of dead people voting. How does that happen? It happens when someone’s parent or grandparent passes away, and they realize that they can cast one vote for themselves and a second as their deceased relative, because they don’t have to present an ID. And the relative doesn’t even have to be deceased. They can just be inactive voters, with people who know them realizing this and taking advantage of the situation.

            If you require an ID to vote, this problem goes away.

            An ID is required to do just about anything in our society. National polls show that a strong majority of minorities favor the voter ID requirement, just like whites do.

            But what you’re saying, by insisting that such laws discriminate against minorities, is that minorities are just too darn stupid to figure out how to present an ID at a voting booth. I don’t agree with you. And if I did agree with you on this, I’d start to wonder if I might be a racist.

          • ph16

            Not to be factitious, but do you mind telling me who conducted those polls and maybe a link? Just as an example, I believe you, but I’d figure I’d ask seeing as your detractors will probably ask you anyway.

          • Brian Fr Langley

            To vote in polls in Canada we always have to produce ID, and this is the way it’s been for decades. Cross the border ID, get car insurance ID, even to write a check, ID. What’s the problem? The only reason to oppose ID to vote, is if you intend to cheat and want to succeed at it. That it prevents minorities from voting is absolutely fallacious. Or for another “F” word farcical. The reason cheating stats are so hard to come by, is even producing these stats is politically incorrect these days. To say (or pretend) people won’t or don’t cheat is a flat out lie. How does one justify sending young men (and women) out to die in foreign battle fields to preserve republican democracy, and then allow their votes to be stolen by cheaters. Today ID is so easy to get, that ID theft has become a way of life for some. Hard to get for minorities? Please?

          • ph16

            Interesting to hear what Canada has done, thank you for your thoughts. I’ll have to consider that.

          • Brian Fr Langley

            Canada is extremely ethnically diverse. Their only growth now for decades has been through immigration. (birth rates are at all time historical lows) In any event there are staggering numbers of folks who speak neither official language (English or French) and still have no problem getting ID. And as I said you need it for absolutely everything. In fact, if a Police Officer wants to give you a ticket for the most minor of offenses ( say spitting on the sidewalk) you MUST produce ID on request. Failure to have ID to the Officers satisfaction, allows the Officer to arrest you, until your ID can be sufficiently established. Last but not least even the most poverty stricken person must have ID to even get the Canadian equivalent of food stamps or other welfare benefits. So what possible excuse is left, besides none at all. (other than some folks want to cheat on election day)

          • ph16

            So I guess the standard order in a traffic stop “License and Registration please” is taken more seriously in Canada.

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            The Washington Post did the most recent, national one. You can filter the results by race to see that minorities supporter voter IDs by a wide margin, as well as whites:
            http://www.washingtonpost.com/page/2010-2019/WashingtonPost/2012/08/12/National-Politics/Polling/question_6226.xml?uuid=Nd4PSOTWEeGXOe75nF-yhQ

          • Wil

            So, you are saying, we should be governed; by polls?
            Well, most people are against bombing Syria. Guess what, it’s going to happen!

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            I’m saying that if minorities themselves favor voter ID laws, how can you possibly make the point those laws discriminate against minorities?

          • Wil

            Are you saying those laws don’t discriminate against minorities?

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            Yes, I’ve said that multiple times now. And a strong majority of minorities are saying that as well.

            I don’t believe minorities are dumber or more incompetent than white people. You believe they are. Thus, you’re the one who’s discriminating.

          • Wil

            John. You are an educated man and you really know the real reason for all those draconian voter laws. And, it ain’t voter fraud!

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            Wil, Requiring someone to present an ID is not “draconian”. Anyone who thinks that is an idiot.

            You yourself wrote that you have no problem with voters having to present an ID, as long as they don’t have to pay for that ID. That’s exactly what Texas is doing.

            So does that mean YOU support “draconian” voter laws?

          • Wil

            What if you don’t have or cannot find your birth certificate. You don’t get to vote? When you have been voting for years! They used to just compare your signature, what was wrong with that?

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            If someone loses their birth certificate AND doesn’t already have a valid ID (very few people would fall into this category based on all of the things in life that requires one or both of them), they can fill out a form to get a copy of their birth certificate, and they can get an ID.

            You have to keep in mind, Wil, that these are adults we’re talking about. Not little kids. They aren’t helpless little creatures who aren’t capable of managing their own affairs.

            I’ve never had anyone compare my signature with anything when I’ve gone to vote, but if some states do that, let me ask you this question: What happens when someone’s signature doesn’t look the same to a election-night volunteer’s untrained eye? Does the volunteer get to decide if a valid voter gets to vote if he or she doesn’t think signatures match? If that were to happen, then you really WOULD have a case of voter suppression.

          • Wil

            Yes, Life has been easy for you, so the hardships that befall others, do not matter to you. How sad!

            There usually are several people to verify the signature.

            BTW, what is your take on shorter voting days and fewer hours, to vote?

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            Life has been easy for me? Wil, you know very little about my life.

            Now, explain to me which “hardships” prevent someone from getting a free ID card? If someone can get themselves to a voting booth on election day, they can certainly go through the process of acquiring an identification card.

          • Wil

            My question to you is: Are the Republican legislators in the red states concerned about voter fraud or voter suppression. A truthful answer, no right wing rhetoric.

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            You’d have to ask Republican legislators that question. Both voter fraud and voter suppression are obviously bad things. The question is whether or not voter ID laws are a form of voter suppression. They’re not. They do, however, reduce vote fraud.

          • Wil

            Do ‘you’ have an opinion? You seem to opine on everything else!

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            I would think that ANY elected representative that was presented evidence of ACTUAL voter suppression would want to act on it.

          • Wil

            In a column on National Review Online’s (NRO) The Corner, Fox News contributor and NRO columnist John Fund and Heritage Foundation senior legal fellow Hans von Spakovsky laid out what they considered “The Latest Evidence Of Voter Fraud.” The evidence they offered, however, amounted to one county in Mississippi that was recently ordered to remove ineligible voters from its registration rolls, and a report released by the conservative Voter Integrity Project showing a statistically insignificant number of alleged voter fraud cases, neither of which showed any conclusive evidence or prosecution of voter fraud.

          • Wil

            I just called the Board of Elections in Ohio (440-350-2700) and found out, if you do not have a photo ID, you can use an electric bill for your identification, to vote.

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            It’s better than nothing. Of course, you probably think THAT is discriminative too, huh?

          • Wil

            Nope, reasonable.

          • Wil

            In Ohio the ID photo is not free.

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            If that’s true (and forgive me for not taking your word for it based on the false information you routinely offer up), I would be in favor of the state paying for them.

          • Wil

            ‘false information’?
            You mean, when I don’t agree with your propaganda!

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            Wil, you write stuff here all the time that isn’t true. You present things as fact that you’re merely guessing at, and you get caught doing it all the time. You know it. Everyone else knows it.

          • Wil

            For example?

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            Seriously? Let’s just take some of your comments for this column alone…

            You said that all current members of the KKK are Republicans. The truth is that you have absolutely no idea and couldn’t name me a single Republican KKK member.

            You said that people have to pay for a voter ID in Texas. Nope!

            You said there is no such thing as voter fraud. There sure is: http://www.truethevote.org/news/how-widespread-is-voter-fraud-2012-facts-figures

            You do this stuff all of the time. You make up facts that you WANT to be true, without having any idea whatsoever if they actually ARE true.

          • Wil

            Voter fraud, is a myth.
            ’nuff said!

          • http://johndalybooks.com/ John Daly

            lol. Your default response when you can’t argue a point.

          • Wil

            >But I also think he’d be appalled by how the media and liberal leaders have worked so hard to keep this country’s racial wounds open, for a multitude of self-serving purposes.<

            Bullcrap!

          • ph16

            I was thinking more in terms of the gangster rap culture that’s pervasive in the inner city and more of the themes Juan Williams talked about in “Enough” and Bill Cosby has talked about over the years.

          • JohnDalyAuthor

            I agree. I disagree with Juan Williams on a lot of things, but he’s absolutely right on this thoughts for lifting up the black community.